Oct 142014
 

Usually one of the first things we want to do with a new server is to restrict access to SSH -service.

So far it seems that everyone advices “disable firewallD, install iptables service and use it like you’ve always used” but how about trying to get along with this new tech?

Restricting access to SSH isn’t as hard as it might seem at the first glance. First we check what services are allowed in public (usually the default) and internal -zones:

# firewall-cmd --zone=internal --list-services
dhcpv6-client ipp-client mdns samba-client ssh
# firewall-cmd --zone=public --list-services
dhcpv6-client ssh

Then we add our admin-IP to internal -zone:

# firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=internal --add-source=<admin-ip>

Remove access to SSH-service from public:

# firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --remove-service=ssh

And reload the changes into use:

# firewall-cmd --reload

–permanent makes changes which stay over reboot/reload, but they aren’t active immediately – without –permanent the changes are active immediately but are lost on reload/reboot

Service definitions can be found (in RHEL/CentOS 7) at /etc/firewalld/services/ – if you create a new one -> use –reload to make it active.

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